Under The Bridge Under The Bridge

Tag: Google
Flutter Flutter Little App

 

So things were not all that terribly interesting at Google I/O this year, at least as far as iOS developers are concerned — 

100 things we announced at I/O ‘18

— until you get down to

90. We shipped Flutter Beta 3, the latest version of our mobile app SDK for creating high-quality, native user experiences on iOS and Android…

That’s always an interesting claim, isn’t it? Well, allegedly it’s

Ready for Production Apps: Flutter Beta 3

This week at Google I/O, we’re announcing the third beta release of Flutter, our mobile app SDK for creating high-quality, native user experiences on iOS and Android, along with showcasing new tooling partners, usage of Flutter by several high-profile customers, and announcing official support from the Material team.

We believe mobile development needs an upgrade. All too often, developers are forced to compromise between quality and productivity: either building the same application twice on both iOS and Android, or settling for a cross-platform solution that makes it hard to deliver the native experience that customers demand. This is why we built Flutter: to offer a new path for mobile development, focused foremost on native performance, advanced visuals, and dramatically improving developer velocity and productivity…

Well, to our ears, this has a distinct ring of the claims made for cross-platform development by for instance Xamarin, which tend to not be widely shared by those who actually attempt to ship products with them:

Xamarin SUCKS! Lessons learned from weeks wasted

I’m really sorry for the language, but this software is simply and literally the worst mega f***ing shit I’ve ever used in my life. This halfass piece of garbage only serves to waste people time. And IKR, how could people pay for this, ffs?!

… SO TO ANYONE OUT THERE WHO, LIKE ME, THOUGHT “HEY, IT CAN’T BE THAT BAD, CAN IT? I’LL JUST SPEND A FEW HOURS, MAYBE A DAY SETTING THINGS UP BUT IT WILL PAY FOR ITSELF”. NO. GO BACK. IT WON’T PAY. IT’LL NEVER PAY. IN FACT, IF YOUR DREAM IS TO WORK AT MICROSOFT THEN MAYBE YOU SHOULD STICK TO XAMARIN. BECAUSE YOU’LL FEEL LIKE YOU’RE FIXING XAMARIN’S BUGS, NOT YOURS. IN FACT, SOMETIMES YOU’LL EVEN FORGET ABOUT YOUR PROJECT. YOU’LL BE JUST LIKE “WTF IS THIS PROJECT DOING HERE? OH, IT’S MINE”, BECAUSE YOU’LL BE SO INTO XAMARIN BUGS. YOU’LL START THINKING ABOUT GOING TO GITHUB AND FIX XAMARIN INSTEAD OF YOUR OWN CODE (SERIOUSLY). THIS IS A DISEASE. DO NOT GO ANY FURTHER. YOU’VE BEEN WARNED.

Don’t hold back there, tell us how you really feel why don’t you?

Or, there’s always the trendy flavor of the last couple years before people actually started trying to maintain real apps with it, React Native:

Native > Flutter > React Native

As we all know there are a lot of cross-platform development frameworks but none beats the user experience of a natively developed application. A few months back here I was trying to appeal for React Native. But when I took it for a full spin for a fun project. I fell flat on my face.

There were many shortcomings when it came to React Native. Since mobile applications heavily depend on swipe-based user interaction and React Native heavily depends on a bridge that makes the JS code run on the native engine. This caused a lot of janking due to bottleneck. List Views using React Native was a nightmare…

Well, that fellow is optimistic about Flutter’s potential, apparently once bitten still not shy. Give it a couple more decades, you’ll be cynical as a troll, just watch … either that or burnt out completely, there does not appear to be any middle ground.

For some additional supporting evidence, here’s hands on experience:

How fast is Flutter? I built a stopwatch app to find out.

According to the docs, high performance is to be expected:

Flutter is designed to help developers easily achieve a constant 60fps.
But what about CPU utilization?

TL;DR: Not as good as native. And you have to do it right…

Now, not as good as native, that’s not stopping people shipping apps with it, check out the Showcase here. As we write this, the Hamilton musical app is the flagship example of a shipping cross-platform Flutter app, and the builders veritably ecstaticize themselves over the experience here: 

Rise Up! — The story of how the Hamilton App uses Flutter to do more for its fans

So there is definitely the potential here to suck less than other cross-platform solutions — not to imply that’s a high bar! — and it’s always good to have options available, yes?

So if you are interested in Flutter —

— and it definitely looks worth at least keeping an eye on to see if it gains further traction or slides into the shambling undeadness of past Google abandoned failures —

— here’s some resources to check out:

Flutter @ Google I/O 2018 YouTube playlist from @flutterio

Udacity’s free Build Native Mobile Apps with Flutter course

… and of course the Wenderlich tutorial empire is staking territory out here already:

Getting Started with Flutter

Getting Started with Flutter in Android Studio screencast

Flutter Navigation Tutorial

And if you, Dear Reader, happen to have some experience building a non-trivial application with Flutter, be sure to let us know how it went!

UPDATES:

Flutter vs React Native: A Developer’s Perspective 

Longtime iOS Dev – First Flutter App

The Flutter Report

Flutter will change everything, and is an excellent choice for iOS development

Introduction to Flutter: Building iOS and Android Apps from a Single Codebase

Fire Up The Base

In case you’ve been floundering about what to do service side since Parse dropped the BaaS, here’s something you’ll want to take a look at — Google has seriously levelled up Firebase with unification and new services:

FireBaseServices.png

Firebase is expanding to become a unified app platform for Android, iOS and mobile web development. We’re adding new tools to help you develop faster, improve app quality, acquire and engage users, and monetize apps. On top of this, we’re launching a brand new analytics product that ties everything together, all while staying true to the guiding principles we’ve had from the beginning:

  • Developer experience matters. Ease-of-use, good documentation, and intuitive APIs make developers happy.
  • Work across platforms. We’ll support you whether you’re building for iOS, Web, or Android.
  • Integrate where possible. Firebase has one SDK, one console, and one place to go for documentation and support…

That’s a lot of features there, with free to minimal pricing until you’re scaled up looks like.

Particularly interesting is that they’ve put at the centre there this new analytics service,

At the heart of Firebase is Firebase Analytics, a free and unlimited analytics solution. Analytics integrates across Firebase features and provides you with unlimited reporting for up to 500 distinct events that you can define using the Firebase SDK. Firebase Analytics reports help you understand clearly how your users behave, which enables you to make informed decisions regarding app marketing and performance optimizations…

Custom audiences can be defined in the Firebase console based on device data, custom events, or user properties. These audiences can be used with other Firebase features when targeting new features or notifications.…

As it happens, we’d just been planning to get around to picking an analytics platform for the next project, as it’s been a hella long time since we last surveyed that space, or even updated with notes on the general consensus:

If marketers are going to be using analytics tools, Mixpanel or Localytics. If developers want data to play with, Flurry.

Since then, Flurry was absorbed into Yahoo Mobile Developer Suite, Localytics and Mixpanel appear to be doing fine although now we have actually accurate marketing analytics from Apple,

App Analytics is Apple’s very own analytics platform. It lives right inside of iTunes Connect. Announced at the WWDC in summer 2014, it launched finally in spring 2015 and just recently added support for tvOS apps. One might say just “another” analytics platform like free solutions from Flurry/Yahoo Mobile, Google or Facebook, but App Analytics finally provides reliable data nobody else can (Spoiler: App Store impressions, referring websites, attribution)

You should read all the rest if you aren’t familiar with it, but since it requires no technical implementation there’s no support decision to be made there so we can move on. Let’s check a couple curated collections:

Apptamin’s App Analytics Tools Round-up

iOS Dev Tools’ Analytics section

awesome-ios’ Analytics section

Well, clearly if you have trouble reaching a decision, ARAnalytics is for you:

ARAnalytics is an analytics abstraction library offering a sane API for tracking events and user data. It currently supports on iOS: Mixpanel, Localytics, Flurry, GoogleAnalytics, KISSmetrics, Crittercism, Crashlytics, Fabric, Bugsnag, Countly, Helpshift, Tapstream, NewRelic, Amplitude, HockeyApp, HockeyAppLib, ParseAnalytics, HeapAnalytics, Chartbeat, UMengAnalytics, Librato, Segmentio, Swrve, YandexMobileMetrica, Adjust, AppsFlyer, Branch, Snowplow, Sentry, Intercom, Keen, Adobe and MobileAppTracker/Tune…

And if you’d prefer to just follow the herd, looks like they’re heading for Twitter these days:

Answers Named #1 in Mobile Analytics for iOS

Back in May, Answers was ranked as #2 on iOS and #3 on Android in the mobile analytics space by SourceDNA, the world’s largest database of mobile app intelligence. Since then, we’ve been building out new features like Answers Events, which helps you track specific actions and events in real time, to better understand how users are behaving within your app.

Today, we’re thrilled to tell you that Answers has now been named the #1 most implemented mobile analytics SDK on iOS — just five months after it was named #2!

So no lack of innovation in that space, definitely. If you decide to jump on the new Firebase bandwagon, be sure to let us know how it goes for you!

UPDATES:

Getting Started with Mobile Analytics

28 Metrics That Matter for Your App

Firebase 101, a simple todo list app

Creating a Backend for Your iOS App Using Firebase

Google’s Firebase developer platform gets better analytics, crash reporting and more

Introducing Firebase with Swift 3: Login and Sign Up; Using Firebase to Integrate Facebook Login in iOS Apps

Keep an eye on the competitive developments over at Microsoft: The Next Generation of HockeyApp

Firebase Tutorial: iOS A/B Testing

Fabric lands top spots for app analytics, stability, and monetization

Well, that makes the decision process simpler: Fabric, R.I.P.

Marco Arment:

iOS devs: Any decent self-hostable crash reporters, analytics packages?

I think it’s wise to consider bringing this in-house these days.

Quick-Chat: “Real time chat app written in Swift 3 using Firebase”

Back-End as a Service for Mobile Apps

Implementing Push Notifications on iOS with Firebase

Using Firebase Cloud Messaging for Remote Notifications in iOS

Advanced Firebase For The Win

Firebase Costs Increased by 7,000%!

Get Started With Firebase for iOS Apps

Scratching the Firebase services with your iOS app

Why Firebase sucks

Google AJAX CDN

Now this is interesting: Google is now providing a CDN service for certain JavaScript libraries, called “Google Ajax Libraries API.” So now instead of dealing with libraries yourself, you can just have Google

  • Manage the hosting, caching, and versioning/bugfixes
  • Serve up a minified version, if one is officially supported
  • Serve the same version to anyone else using it

So that’s helpful to anyone writing web pages by reducing code management hassle, but on the bandwidth-limited iPhone browsing over cell networks (3G or not) that last one is a really compelling reason to get on board, since sharing caching with any other page that happens to use that library as well is going to make the user’s experience noticeably better no doubt. Here’s the list of libraries they support right off:

  • jQuery
  • prototype
  • script.aculo.us
  • MooTools
  • dojo

I’d say that narrows right down the list of AJAX libraries we’re even going to consider learning!

h/t: Slashdot!

Google DocType

Here’s a new resource for web developers of all flavours: Google DocType:

Google Doctype is an open encyclopedia and reference library. Written by web developers, for web developers. It includes articles on web security, JavaScript DOM manipulation, CSS tips and tricks, and more. The reference section includes a growing library of test cases for checking cross-browser and cross-platform compatibility.

h/t: Google Code Blog!