Under The Bridge Under The Bridge

Category: Tools
Black Friday Deals 2019

Seems like the Black Friday deals get a little earlier each year don’t they? In fact, we’re hurrying this post out because there’s eight hours fifty-three minutes left in a Black Friday deal that, in fact, ends Wednesday morning:

Black Friday 2019 — special offers on Pixelmator apps

Starting today, you can get the amazing Pixelmator Pro for 25% off. This discount will be available for a week, until December 3rd. In addition, Pixelmator Photo, our incredible photo editor for iPad, is completely free for 24 hours until 9am ET, November 27th. Spread the word!

So hurry on over to App Store on your iPad and grab that.then

… and speaking of free stuff, Packt has not only the usual discounts pretty much everybody that does e-learning has on but a completely free week as well, so if you haven’t got an account there now’s a particularly good week for it! 

… and speaking of e-learning, looks like the $99 a year subscription is going to be a regular thing over at 

raywenderlich.com Black Friday Sale: $99/year Subscriptions and More!

Of which there’s enough there this year on SwiftUI and Combine and all that new stuff we need to get up to speed on right quick that we finally figured it was likely worth shelling out for a subscription this year, recommend you seriously consider it too!

As usual, there’s a macOS / iOS developer focused deals repo up on Github

💰💸💰 Black Friday Deals 💰💸💰 

And Michael Tsai has deals on his own apps and a roundup here!

Black Friday 2019

This Xcode Goes To 11

Well, this has been a particularly exciting year on the Xcode front, hasn’t it?

  • Xcode 11 supports development with SwiftUI
  • SwiftUI live views and inline results in playgrounds are supported…
  • Xcode 11 adds support for Mac Catalyst to bring iPad apps to the Mac…
  • Xcode now supports creating and working with Swift packages, as well as adding, removing, and managing package dependencies…
  • An XCFramework makes it possible to bundle a binary framework or library for multiple platforms…
  • The new Metrics organizer shows battery life and performance analytics for your app to help you drive optimizations…
  • Xcode 11 supports the new Apple Development and Apple Distribution certificate types. These certificates support building, running, and distributing apps on any Apple platform…
  • Metal is available in iOS 13 and tvOS 13 simulators when running on macOS 10.15…
  • Introduces the ability to view inline code diffs for changes in the Source Editor…

Not sure “particularly exciting” covers it actually, this is the biggest Xcode update in the history of ever far as we can remember! Read the whole thing, and then the latest point release notes up to 11.3 Beta as we type this; and here’s a couple particularly good visual-enhanced tours of the new goodies:

Xcode: All the Way to 11

What’s new in Xcode 11? [Updated for 11.1 and 11.2]

Personally, this version of Xcode is a veritable benediction, given how many years we’ve been desperately looking forward to disposing of third party dependency managers…

Ready for Swift Package Manager?

Replacing CocoaPods with Swift Package Manager

Launching the SwiftPM Library + SwiftPM Catalog

…and once more being able to use workspaces as actual, y’know, workspaces. We’re not quite there with our latest project — the last serious roadblock is Firebase requiring binary framework support — but we are very close indeed! Mind you, we did have to do some considered refactoring to dispose of some pods that weren’t Pure Swift™, there’s a good if overly despondent summary of the various existing drawbacks here:

Dependency Heck

The state of iOS dependency management in 2019 is not great, and might get worse before it gets better…

Although we disagree with that completely, it’s orders of magnitude better than Xcode 10 even with the loose ends lying about still and getting better by the day, we say! In the meantime, aside from the third party dependency migration pains, even more important in the future is it’s much easier now to manage your internal dependancies and modularity with SPM:

Update your existing iOS Framework to Swift Package

Creating Swift Packages in Xcode + Editing A Swift Package

Managing dependencies using the Swift Package Manager

And that’s about enough for SPM for now. Next thing we’d like to highlight from that intro list is what drives that Metrics organizer, in case you’d overlooked it so far:

MetricKit

With MetricKit, you can receive on-device app power and performance metrics captured by the system. A registered app receives reports containing data about the previous 24 hours at most once per day…

Introduction at Improving Battery Life and Performance

NSHipster has a deeper dive in Metric​Kit

And for a really deep dive, check out MetricKit Internals!

SwiftUI and Catalyst are going to require some deep, deep diving of their own; for now, we’ll list miscellaneous other new and old Xcode tips we’ve collected since The Xth-Code Files: Xcode 10 Tips:

one small change for xcode, one giant leap for productivity

XCode allows you to take a snapshot of the state of the app you are developing and restore it later when you run the app or run the tests. Pretty cool!

Xcode 11 environmental overrides

Have you used the accessibility inspector to change the dynamic type size of your running app? Did you know you can do that directly from the debugger with Xcode 11? Even better, it allows you to override the interface style to quickly switch between light and dark modes…

Sherlock turbocharges your iOS simulator

There aren’t many times outside of WWDC where Apple developers see a new tool and immediately think “I need that in my life.” Sherlock by Inspired Code is one such tool: it injects itself into the iOS Simulator so that it can monitor views and adjust them in real time…

NSHipster’s simctl has Simulator tips you really want to know about

Better Storyboards with Xcode 11

Using Xcode Previews with existing views without using SwiftUI

Add a View <> ViewModel Jump To Counterpart

XCAssetsKit: “.xcassets parser written in Swift”

QuickLook plugin to visualize .car files (compiled Asset Catalogs)

Speeding up with Xcode Behaviors

Awesome-Xcode-Behaviors

The fastest way to Xcode: “Using the power of aliases in your Terminal”

Xcode: Basics of the four-block wonder aka “Navigate to Related Items”

37 Xcode Tips and Shortcuts to speed up your daily development

Unused images and resources clean up in Xcode

Unused localized strings clean up from a Strings file

Variable Width Strings

Where the &$!#% Is Localizable.Strings?!?

PoeditApp: “The fastest and most convenient way to translate apps & sites with gettext”

Periphery: “A tool to identify unused code in Swift projects.”

Streamlining your development workflow with Xcode Templates

ios-project-template: “iOS project template with fastlane lanes, Travis CI jobs and GitHub integrations of Codecov, HoundCI for SwiftLint and Danger”

Building Faster in iOS with Bazel

Project generation: Introduction to development of Tuist: “Bootstrap, maintain, and interact with Xcode projects at any scale”

And finally, to remind us that not quite everything is better these days:

Xcode​Kit and Xcode Source Editor Extensions

When we last wrote about extending Xcode in 2014, we were living in a golden age, and didn’t even know it…

Ah well. There’s still some good ones out there — our Most Useful™ Award goes to

SwiftMockGeneratorForXcode — An Xcode extension (plugin) to generate Swift test doubles automatically.

Check it out!

Kowalski, Analytics!

So it’s been a little while since we last looked at analytics for your iOS app, and as it happens we have a new one just out that could use some sober second thought on its analysis strategy going forward; let’s take a look at that today, shall we?

Kowalski

 

First off, since you don’t have to do any work to get them it’s always a good idea to keep abreast of the latest developments in App Store Connect App Analytics – especially since there’s a bunch there that you can’t get with any other service! But, since you can’t report any custom events so they’re not very interesting development-wise, we’ll just remind you of the documentation and move right along, to consider in detail the current crop of services that are FREE! and UNLIMITED! that being the tier of service that us scrappy Indies are most interested in naturally!

So, last time we were checking out this analytics thing, the buzz was all about Fabric Answers

The best of Answers realtime analytics is now part of Firebase. New apps should use Google Analytics for Firebase…

Well then. How about that old standby for website centric organizations, Google Analytics? Oh, look they’re shutting that down too this Hallowe’en…

To use the latest generation of app reporting in Google Analytics, you’ll need to install the Firebase SDK. If you do not have a Firebase project, go to firebase.google.com to get started. Once you have completed the setup, return to Google Analytics…

Huh. OK, if you’re tied into the Google ecosystem, or anything that was good it acquired, it seems your choice is very clear. Singular, in fact!

Personally, we’d prefer not to be tied into the Google ecosystem, particularly if we’re not depending on it for anything besides analytics, so we’ll leave the Firebase option off the table as long as possible. Besides, it isn’t completely free, although the free usage limits are generous.

For completely free to the developer, Flurry appears to still be the leader in app support suites, with push and real time analytics and advertising and remote config and all sorts of other goodies these days; come a long way since Peter Farago stopped by to say thanks for our first note on it over ten years ago and now he’s “GM & VP Flurry” at Verizon with a job description of “Making Flurry awesome(r)” so that would seem to indicate that it’s weathered its various acquisitions nicely and continues to be a solid choice going forward.

While we were developing this last project, we tried out Visual Studio App Center and were reasonably pleased with it in general — we didn’t get around to creating any specific events, but even the default session monitoring of App Center Analytics is providing useful information — it’s still maturing, but if you’re tied in to Microsoft platforms or the slowly migrating HockeyApp, this is the support suite for you! Without that, it doesn’t have a compelling use case … aside from being Not-Google. Should you find that compelling.

Another option, if you have a Facebook app as pretty much everyone does these days, is Facebook Analytics where if you’ve linked in the Facebook SDK you can see session info in Facebook’s Event Manager things logged with App Events for iOS. Not actually real time though, and you don’t get the push notifications and crash reporting and so forth of the above suites, so picking one of them is probably what most of us will be interested in. 

Now, there are a veritable plethora of other analytics services out there that don’t meet the FREE! and UNLIMITED! test, any number of which may be suited enough to your particular needs to be worth their investment: here’s a few of the better recentish roundups we looked at putting together post, check them out if you have a budget:

The Apps Have Spoken: Top 13 iOS App Analytics Platforms [2019]

Top 11 Mobile App Analytics Platforms in 2019 (Pricing Included)

Top 20 Mobile App Analytics Tools: Which is the best one for you?

Top App Analytics Tools (2019)

And if you don’t want a service at all but want to host your own analytics, an excellent start on that is this:

Countly Community Edition
Your very own, self hosted and open source desktop, web, mobile analytics server and SDKs

At least it looks like it. We wouldn’t know. We’re not into self-hosting or rolling our own of anything we can possibly get away with not. But if you are, check it out and let us know how that goes for you!

And finally, whichever one of these alternatives you pick first, it’s a solid bet that you’ll be called on to change it at some point, because that’s just the way it always works, isn’t it? Here is a nicely elegant post about creating

A modular analytics layer in Swift

We are going to build a layer that avoids using a static API, puts any backend APIs behind a protocol, uses the power of Swift enums and pairs each event with the pieces of data it needs to contain.

More specifically it should:

  • Be easy to report new and existing events.
  • Allow the data be sent to whichever analytics backend we wish to use, even multiple.
  • Be testable and mockable, allowing it to be an injected dependency.
  • Allow events to be reported from anywhere in the app, but encourage best practices.
  • Have compile-time safety of events and their properties…

Sounds like just about the way we like to put service wrappers around our dependencies yep — so whatever analytics you choose, check that out!

UPDATES:

8 Critical KPIs for Your App and How to Track Them

Assertions in Production for tracking internal errors

SmartlookConsentSDK for getting user consent

iOS UI/UX Design Workflows

It’s been pretty much a given for a while that Sketch is the go to UI design tool of choice for our pretty, pretty apps — but we’ve never examined alternatives suited to the indie developer, or indeed the full workflow; so let’s look at some options for that today!

As a starting point, here’s the Nodes Design Stack 2018 for their selections from end to end of the design process:

Sketch – Complete design tool for static mockups

The keystone of app design tools, when we asked one of our designers what projects they used Sketch for, the response was: “Pretty much all of them…”

Abstract – Version control and seamless collaboration on design files

…then Abstract came along, offering the type of collaborative platform that developers had found in tools like Github. Now, Sketch files can be added to a project, and team members can jump on board, editing and saving their progress into a master file.

InVision – Prototyping focused on flows

Another indispensable entry. InVision picks up where Sketch leaves off, with an emphasis on functionality. Once they’ve got their static designs done in Sketch, our designers move over to InVision and start making a dummy prototype with some of the transitions and animations that go beyond just visuals to define UX…

Zeplin – Design handoff for development

Once your prototype is up and running, and everyone’s happy with the result, it’s time to hand over the reins to your developers. That’s when we use Zeplin…

Principle – State based prototyping tool for complex interaction

Once you’ve designed your interface, Principle is there to build on animated and interactive elements. It’s particularly adept at refining micro interactions, which play a big part in the overall experience of using an app…

All well and good, probably most large shops would nod along with that as being a solid stack, but that’s a pretty large investment for a little indie shop that’s you and a designer … at most … right? So, what kind of alternatives might you consider? Well, there is one in particular that we’ve noted with interest:

Adobe XD

Adobe XD is made for designers like you, by designers like us. It’s the fastest way to design, prototype, and share any user experience, from websites and mobile apps to voice interactions, and more. And it’s free.

Adobe XD reimagines the way designers create experiences with fast, intuitive tools that get you into your designs and get out of your way. Power up prototypes with voice. Automatically resize elements for different screens. Create amazing animations between artboards without timelines. It’s everything you need for what’s next in UX — and it’s only in XD.

Switch from Design to Prototype mode in a click, then drag wires between artboards to turn your wireframes into interactive prototypes. Make changes on the fly and see them on your phone. Share auto-saved cloud documents securely with your team from anywhere—you can even edit them offline.

Well, that seems to cover the entire stack — and at a price of FREE?! Mind you, that is for only one actively shared project at a time … but you probably are working on only one at a time, and it’s probably a good bet that a designer you work with has an Adobe CC subscription, so that wouldn’t apply to them. And between integrating other Adobe tools plus your entire design workflow in one tool … seems pretty unbeatable to us, really. But let’s see what real designers think, shall we?

Will Adobe XD kill Sketch and InVision?

Prototyping, design, and animation all happen in one space when using Adobe XD, meaning testing and iterating on design happens easier and much faster. The design process is effortless, interactions and animations all happen in context of each other allowing these disciplines to become part of the design process, rather than independently of each other. This is very powerful and enables design to happen at the speed of thought.

The ability to move from wireframe to hi-fidelity prototyping, to developer handoffs in one piece of software shows how much Adobe focuses on workflows. By making workflows simple and easy, they are addressing some of designers biggest pain points — something only Adobe is truly equipped to do via its software ecosystem…

Read the whole thing if you have time, but TL;DR the claim is that things go exactly as we would expect! So at the very least, next time we have a greenfield project, we’re going to actively look for a designer to work with us on an XD workflow.

There’s many other tools out there — check out 18 Of The Best Tools For Mobile App Designers for instance — but we’re going to stick with Adobe XD being the next one we’re going to deep dive into, hey the price is certainly right!

 

So much for tools; now, let’s turn to the philosophy of UX design to give you some inspiration when you sit down with them! Here’s some excellent articles we’ve noted:

How to design an Apple Design Award-winning app

For a mobile designer, winning an ADA trophy with its crisp aluminium body and touch-activated glowing Apple logo represents the pinnacle of design achievement. In Apple’s own words, the ADA’s recognise the “creative artistry and technical achievements of developers who reflect the best in design, innovation and technology on Apple platforms.”

So what does it take to end up on the receiving end of one of these coveted accolades? As the creative director and co-founder of a successful app development agency, I was more than a little bit curious to find out…

How To Design Emotional Interfaces For Boring Apps

When your product deals with repetitive tasks, it’s hard to keep users excited about it. That’s where UI comes into play. Let’s talk about elements that make an interface more emotional…

How to simplify your design

Companies are in constant pursuit of building simple and usable products. More features, new technologies, and advanced capabilities but still in a lightweight and simple to use format. More often than not, making it simple is the hardest thing there can be…

10 cheat codes for designing User Interfaces

Design can’t be simply explained by colors, shapes, and text. It is a process that has a “Why” behind it, that whenever we create a text bigger, add a shadow, or change the color, there has to be a reason of why things have to be…

And finally, let’s turn to resources that give you some immediate practical help with your mock up designs and layouts, from ready to use UI kits down to individual assets, shall we?

Apple Design Resources

60+ great UI kits for iOS engineers

Sometimes we have to release products when we don’t have a nice design in place. We need to ship fast but keep good UX inside our iOS apps… Using prepared UI kits is done exactly for those moments!

UX Design Patterns for Mobile Apps: Which and Why

Mobile Patterns – UI UX Inspirational Gallery for iOS and Android

Mobile Design Patterns – Pttrns

Mobbin – Latest Mobile Design Patterns

User flow design inspiration

All in One Bookmark Links for Designer

UPDATES:

30 Things We Often Forget When Designing Mobile Apps

Dark Mode — Working with Color Systems

Health iOS app redesign sprint in 8 hours

Tip: Make Multiple Apple ID 2FA Less F’n A

So, you been getting more than one of these emails recently? Or just one, but you keep your developer Apple ID and your personal Apple ID separate?

You are receiving this email because you have the Account Holder role in a developer program, with full access to tools, resources, and benefits included with your membership. In an effort to keep accounts more secure, two-factor authentication will be required to sign in to your Apple Developer account and Certificates, Identifiers & Profiles starting February 27, 2019. This extra layer of security for your Apple ID helps ensure that you’re the only person who can access your account.

Wee-eee-lllll, as so far Apple devices are not multiuser, that’s a bit of a conundrum isn’t it now?

  • We could have a dedicated device with a phone number for each account, which for the prolific contractor is … impractical.
  • We could log in and out of iCloud accounts every time we want to access developer stuff, which is … even more impractical.
  • Oh, dear. Well, while we wait for Apple to provide a practical alternative, here’s some suggestions

How to activate Apple ID 2fa when you have two accounts

  1. Set up a new user account on your Mac
  2. Login into your iCloud account tied to the developer account under the new macOS user.
  3. Activate two-factor authentication and add your preferred phone number as a backup.
  4. Verify you are able to login into your account via another device or via browser at appleid.apple.com.
  5. Logout of iCloud account on the temp macOS user and switch back to your main macOS user.
  6. Delete the temp account and now, you should be able to use the 2fa via the phone validation every time.

This next piece takes it a step further to full 2FA — did you know your devices can, in fact, be logged into multiple iCloud accounts? We never thought to try that:

Apple Two-Factor Authentication for a Secondary Apple ID

As it turns out, you can be logged in to multiple iCloud accounts on the same device or account. Certain services, such as iCloud storage, or the Photo Library, will only work with the primary iCloud account, but other services, including 2FA, will work for all iCloud accounts.

On your iOS device go to Settings > Passwords & Accounts > Add Account, and choose to add another iCloud account. You probably want to turn off all services, like Mail, Calendar, etc. secondary account.

On the Mac you can do the same in System Preferences > Internet Accounts. You can use both your Mac and iOS devices for 2FA.

Now the secondary Apple ID will prompt the devices you are logged in as for 2FA.

So there you go, Dear Multiple Apple ID Using Readers — good luck in next week’s 2FPocalypse!

UPDATE:

Tips, tricks, and horror stories: Developer Apple ID’s to Require Two-Factor Authentication

Apple’s 2FA announcement will break all Your iOS CI/CD Pipelines. How to Prepare For It

Keep using Fastlane with Apple’s 2FA changes

Black Friday Deals 2018

So it’s that shopping event of the year again, and let’s round up some deals, shall we? First off, let’s borrow @mjtsai’s list

Black Friday 2018

 

My apps are on sale for Black Friday and Cyber Monday, and here are some other good deals that I found:
C-Command Software (my apps)
1Password
Checkout (code SHOPSMALL2018)
Corduroy Code
Eastgate Systems
Ergonis Software (code BlackFriday18P)
equinux
MacHeist
No Starch Press (code FRIDAY42)
Pragmatic Bookshelf (code turkeysale2018)
Realmac
Softorino
Southtree (code THANKS)
SQLPro Studio
Twelve South
Twocanoes Software
vBulletin (code ANNUAL5018)
See also: Vector, MacRumors, 9To5Mac, iMore, Thrifter.

To which we’ll add, if you need any books or courses, head over to

raywenderlich.com Black Friday Sale: Yearly Subscription for Just $99!

In particular, we’re very seriously considering the Mega Android & Kotlin Bundle – 2018 as it’s starting to look like Kotlin Native is going to be a viable cross platform language soon, don’t you think?

MacSurfer is still the best general Mac/iOS news aggregator around, so keep an eye there over the weekend; AppleInsider has a good roundup too.

And if you’ve got any hot deals for developers we’ve missed, let us know!

 UPDATES:

Paw is the best native API tool and it’s 50% off!

Deals for iOS Developers and Designers

💰💸💰 Black Friday Deals 💰💸💰 on Github

The Xth-Code Files: Xcode 10 Tips

Now that we’ve hopefully all got our iOS 12 and Swift 4.2 migrations under control, let’s catch our breath and dive a little deeper into what’s new since last year with Xcode 10, shall we? 

What’s New in Xcode

Dark Mode Interface and Mac App Support

  • All-new dark appearance throughout Xcode and Instruments
  • Asset catalogs add dark and light variants for custom colors and image assets
  • Interface Builder switches between dark and light previews of your interface
  • Debug your Mac apps in dark or light variants without changing OS settings

Source Control

  • Changes in the local repository or upstream on a shared server are highlighted directly within the editor…
  • Support for cloud-hosted and self-hosted Git server offerings from Atlassian Bitbucket, as well as GitLab to go along with existing GitHub support.
  • Xcode offers to rebase your changes when pulling the latest version of code from your repository.
  • SSH keys are generated if needed, and uploaded to service providers for you.

Editor Enhancements

  • Place multiple cursors in your code editor to make many changes at once.
  • Code folding ribbon can now hide any code block surrounded by braces.
  • Over-scroll makes it easy to center the last lines of code in the middle of your screen.

Playgrounds Built for Machine Learning

  • New REPL-like model reruns your existing playground code instantly.
  • Run your code up to any specific line, or type shift-return to run the code you just added.
  • Import the Create ML framework to interactively train new models, and then write code to test the model right in the playground. When finished, drag the model into your app.

Testing and Debugging

  • Debugging symbols are downloaded from a new device five times faster than before.
  • Xcode will spawn a collection of identical Simulators to take advantage of your multi-core Mac, and fan tests out to run in parallel, completing your test suite many times faster.
  • Run tests in random or linear order.
  • Instruments automatically show OSLog signposts you add into your code.
  • Build and share your own custom instruments package to provide unique data visualization and analysis for your own code.
  • Memory debugger uses a compact layout to make it easier to investigate your memory graph.
  • Metal shader debugger lets you easily inspect the execution of your vertex, fragment, compute, and tile shader code.
  • Metal dependency viewer provides a detailed graph of how resources are used in your Metal-based app.

Build Performance

  • New build system enabled by default with improved performance throughout.
  • Swift compiler builds each individual file significantly faster.
  • Large Swift projects build for debugging dramatically faster when using the incremental build setting.

That’s a pretty good selection of improvements, yes? And we have an admirably exhaustive collection of release notes to dig deeper:

Xcode 10 Release Notes

Interface Builder Release Notes for Xcode 10

Build System Release Notes for Xcode 10

Source Editor Release Notes for Xcode 10

Swift 4 .2 Release Notes for Xcode 10

So, we recommend you Read Them All! of course, but here let’s call out the things that you definitely don’t to overlook. #1 is your optimization flags:

If you’ve been around for a while, chances are you’ve set Whole Module Optimization for your project. This is now incorrect: it prevents incremental builds and those are faster. For the definitive word on that, see What’s New in Swift from WWDC 2018, at 11:40:

Stop Using Debug with Whole Module Compilation

Doesn’t get more explicit than that!

As well, there’s a new Build with Timing Summary action (or -buildWithTimingSummary flag to -xcodebuild) that will tell you exactly where all the time is going. There’s a pair of articles here that go into more detail on those and other goodies:

Enabling newly added opt-in features in Xcode 10

Build performance analysing in Xcode 10

#2, now that you’ve got the compilation flags settled, is how to parallelize your building as much as possible. There’s a new Parallelize Build option in your scheme’s build settings, and if it’s not checked, go check it. With some luck, it’ll all Just Work™, but if you have any code generating phases — we like R.swift, for instance — you’re going to find that parallelization isn’t going to work until you set the script file output filenames properly. This, and a good bit more, is explained in detail at

Improving Your Build Time in Xcode 10

#3 — speaking of parallelization — is that now your tests can be run in parallel, and randomized to boot, to make sure that you don’t have any implicit dependencies in your tests! Those are another couple optin checkboxes — for full details watch WWDC 2018’s What’s New in Testing, or check the notes at

WWDC 2018 What’s New in Testing Recap

That’s about it for the major active actions you need take to make your project Xcode 10 savvy, but there’s plenty more nuggets to dig up. For instance, exporting NSData easily:

Xcode 10 has a new QuickLook popover for (NS)Data. It now provides an “Export” feature that can be used to dump memory contents to a file. This is very convenient when you want to investigate data with external editors. (e.g. the fantastic HexFiend)

Also, you’ve no doubt noticed already that the Library is now its own window, and may have found its behaviour somewhat opaque — to keep it open by holding down Option, and some more power tips, check out

Xcode 10 Library Tips

Xcode 10 Storyboard Changes

And let’s not fail to not your annual reminder to clean your old Simulators:

$ xcrun simctl delete unavailable
$ rm -rf ~/Library/Developer/Xcode/iOS\ DeviceSupport/

That should free up at least a few gigs for you. 

Finally, if you’re really interested in digging into Xcode trivia deeper than “delete it whenever things start acting squirrely,” check out:

What’s inside the Derived Data folder?

UPDATES:

Unleashing the power of asset catalogs and bundles on iOS

Xcode & Instruments: Measuring Launch time, CPU Usage, Memory Leaks, Energy Impact and Frame Rate

Building custom Xcode Instruments Package

Building an iOS App Without Xcode’s Build System

awesome-xcode-extensions: “Awesome native Xcode extensions.”

The hidden value of Xcode schemes

Xcode Environment Specific Configuration

Measuring Your App’s Memory Usage with Instruments

Create Xcode file templates and share them with your team

Simulator tools to get more out of the simulator

Xcode file variants without targets

It’s time to use Swift Package Manager

Improving App Performance with Order Files

Xcode: Comparing Target Build Settings

xcode-register: “Register Xcode plugins to a new IDE version”

Woodpecker: “build a communication channel between mac and your app”

Homemade Marzipan Recipes: UIKit on macOS

Well, we are definitely going to accept credulously everything Mark Gurman tells us from now on, because he called it six months early: Yes, UIKit is coming to macOS, and it is, in fact, code named “Marzipan”— top marks! And there’s been a wide range of reactions to that, the best collected (as usual!) over at Michael Tsai’s blog:

Apple Announces Marzipan for 2019

One particularly notable contrarian voice can be found at Apple Didn’t Kill AppKit, Millenials Did:

But here’s the painful part: the techniques to do these things are already available, well-known, and very few people are using them. There are still lots of iPhone-only apps, or apps that make poor use of the iPad and just let their table views stretch out to infinity. And as for tvOS… it already runs UIKit. Your scenes are actual damn UIViewControllers. And yet look at the dearth of TV apps. We’ve had Marzipan on the TV for years and almost nobody uses it…

Well yes, that’s a good argument, and yes, it’s not all that hard to make a UIKit+AppKit app now if you want to, 

To be clear, the enemy is not other Apple-platform developers. The enemy is the use of bloated, cross-platform, phone-it-in frameworks. “Write once, run everywhere” has been promised and come up wanting for decades: Java applications and applets, Adobe AIR, Xamarin, PhoneGap, and so on. One semi-success story of recent years are the various approaches like Electron and Chromium, which effectively embed an entire instance of the Chrome web browser in an app wrapper. This approach is used by such Mac apps as Slack, Discord, and Spotify.

It is also a goddamned scourge, and straight up an abuse of the end-user’s equipment.

And yes, yes, that too.

However, none of these objections are particularly subtle, and yet Apple’s put a couple years so far into this and is doubling down. All in order to save, spitballing here, maybe 15-25% of any well-architected app would need to be different? Well, that makes people figure, also quite reasonably, that the real agenda here is to support the ARM Macs That Everyone Expects Sooner Or Later:

Marzipan as a Path to ARM Based Macs

What if MacOS on ARM only ran these new UIKit apps?

That’s a scary thought for this MacOS developer.

But then again, we already have this and it’s called iOS on the iPad. And maybe, just maybe, and remember these are half baked thoughts, but maybe Apple is wondering if some Pro users might be better served by MacOS Touch 1.0 running on ARM.

An interesting perspective. But, as announced, Apple is using it themselves, so we know that they evaluated the cross-platform strategy ably ranted on behalf of above, and they decided it made more sense to engineer this Grand UIKit Emulation Layer … well, for some reason. Be fascinating to find out what next year or two!

In the meantime, what’s shipping now is surprisingly functional, people are finding:

and although it’s generally agreed that you shouldn’t pay too much attention to the current implementation details, if you want to have some quick fun:

marzipanify

marzipanify is an unsupported commandline tool to take an existing iOS Simulator binary (with minimum deployment target of iOS 12.0) and statically convert it and its embedded libraries & frameworks to run on macOS 10.14’s UIKit runtime (Marzipan)…

MarzipanTool  — Port an iOS app to macOS 10.14 in 5 minutes

Here’s how to port your iOS apps to macOS 10.14 Beta using Apple’s iOSMac/Marzipan framework. A “Hello World” iOS app can become a macOS app in less than 5 minutes. (I timed it.).

Marzipan Platter

At WWDC 2018 Apple announced that they are working on a multi-year strategy to make it easier to port UIKit applications to the Mac. While some first-party applications such as the Home & News app are going to use this API in macOS 10.14, third-party developers won’t have official access for another year. As a result, I made this project to help tinkerers/other impatient people get a taste of what’s to come when Apple gives everyone access to Marzipan next year…

Marzipan – UIKit on macOS

For this post I prepared a very simple app — that allows you to fetch top stories from Hacker News and present them in a simple UITableView. This app is simple as far as functionality is concerned but includes some standard plumbing and networking to see whether common libraries can be used on macOS. The good news is that this is indeed possible and we can use libraries like Alamofire, Swinject and others without any special effort!

So, it doesn’t take too much to figure that Marzipan is going to be extremely important in the not so distant future … get started today!

But please, don’t do what this guy did, even tongue in cheek and all…

Marzipants

Here’s a proof-of-concept that React Native can work* (*lol) under Marzipan.

But, like, it’s proof that we don’t need Electron, right? 💪

… It’s surprising how well it’s working. Besides the obvious mobile-specific things, it’s running abouuuut as well as tvOS builds of React Native.

I wouldn’t recommend using it. Ever. C’mon now.

UPDATES:

Marzipan: Porting iOS Apps to the Mac

The Case Against Marzipan

Marzipan 2021

Making Marzipan Apps Sing

Bringing iOS Apps to macOS Using Marzipanify

Flutter Flutter Little App

 

So things were not all that terribly interesting at Google I/O this year, at least as far as iOS developers are concerned — 

100 things we announced at I/O ‘18

— until you get down to

90. We shipped Flutter Beta 3, the latest version of our mobile app SDK for creating high-quality, native user experiences on iOS and Android…

That’s always an interesting claim, isn’t it? Well, allegedly it’s

Ready for Production Apps: Flutter Beta 3

This week at Google I/O, we’re announcing the third beta release of Flutter, our mobile app SDK for creating high-quality, native user experiences on iOS and Android, along with showcasing new tooling partners, usage of Flutter by several high-profile customers, and announcing official support from the Material team.

We believe mobile development needs an upgrade. All too often, developers are forced to compromise between quality and productivity: either building the same application twice on both iOS and Android, or settling for a cross-platform solution that makes it hard to deliver the native experience that customers demand. This is why we built Flutter: to offer a new path for mobile development, focused foremost on native performance, advanced visuals, and dramatically improving developer velocity and productivity…

Well, to our ears, this has a distinct ring of the claims made for cross-platform development by for instance Xamarin, which tend to not be widely shared by those who actually attempt to ship products with them:

Xamarin SUCKS! Lessons learned from weeks wasted

I’m really sorry for the language, but this software is simply and literally the worst mega f***ing shit I’ve ever used in my life. This halfass piece of garbage only serves to waste people time. And IKR, how could people pay for this, ffs?!

… SO TO ANYONE OUT THERE WHO, LIKE ME, THOUGHT “HEY, IT CAN’T BE THAT BAD, CAN IT? I’LL JUST SPEND A FEW HOURS, MAYBE A DAY SETTING THINGS UP BUT IT WILL PAY FOR ITSELF”. NO. GO BACK. IT WON’T PAY. IT’LL NEVER PAY. IN FACT, IF YOUR DREAM IS TO WORK AT MICROSOFT THEN MAYBE YOU SHOULD STICK TO XAMARIN. BECAUSE YOU’LL FEEL LIKE YOU’RE FIXING XAMARIN’S BUGS, NOT YOURS. IN FACT, SOMETIMES YOU’LL EVEN FORGET ABOUT YOUR PROJECT. YOU’LL BE JUST LIKE “WTF IS THIS PROJECT DOING HERE? OH, IT’S MINE”, BECAUSE YOU’LL BE SO INTO XAMARIN BUGS. YOU’LL START THINKING ABOUT GOING TO GITHUB AND FIX XAMARIN INSTEAD OF YOUR OWN CODE (SERIOUSLY). THIS IS A DISEASE. DO NOT GO ANY FURTHER. YOU’VE BEEN WARNED.

Don’t hold back there, tell us how you really feel why don’t you?

Or, there’s always the trendy flavor of the last couple years before people actually started trying to maintain real apps with it, React Native:

Native > Flutter > React Native

As we all know there are a lot of cross-platform development frameworks but none beats the user experience of a natively developed application. A few months back here I was trying to appeal for React Native. But when I took it for a full spin for a fun project. I fell flat on my face.

There were many shortcomings when it came to React Native. Since mobile applications heavily depend on swipe-based user interaction and React Native heavily depends on a bridge that makes the JS code run on the native engine. This caused a lot of janking due to bottleneck. List Views using React Native was a nightmare…

Well, that fellow is optimistic about Flutter’s potential, apparently once bitten still not shy. Give it a couple more decades, you’ll be cynical as a troll, just watch … either that or burnt out completely, there does not appear to be any middle ground.

For some additional supporting evidence, here’s hands on experience:

How fast is Flutter? I built a stopwatch app to find out.

According to the docs, high performance is to be expected:

Flutter is designed to help developers easily achieve a constant 60fps.
But what about CPU utilization?

TL;DR: Not as good as native. And you have to do it right…

Now, not as good as native, that’s not stopping people shipping apps with it, check out the Showcase here. As we write this, the Hamilton musical app is the flagship example of a shipping cross-platform Flutter app, and the builders veritably ecstaticize themselves over the experience here: 

Rise Up! — The story of how the Hamilton App uses Flutter to do more for its fans

So there is definitely the potential here to suck less than other cross-platform solutions — not to imply that’s a high bar! — and it’s always good to have options available, yes?

So if you are interested in Flutter —

— and it definitely looks worth at least keeping an eye on to see if it gains further traction or slides into the shambling undeadness of past Google abandoned failures —

— here’s some resources to check out:

Flutter @ Google I/O 2018 YouTube playlist from @flutterio

Udacity’s free Build Native Mobile Apps with Flutter course

… and of course the Wenderlich tutorial empire is staking territory out here already:

Getting Started with Flutter

Getting Started with Flutter in Android Studio screencast

Flutter Navigation Tutorial

And if you, Dear Reader, happen to have some experience building a non-trivial application with Flutter, be sure to let us know how it went!

UPDATES:

Flutter vs React Native: A Developer’s Perspective 

Longtime iOS Dev – First Flutter App

The Flutter Report

Flutter will change everything, and is an excellent choice for iOS development

Introduction to Flutter: Building iOS and Android Apps from a Single Codebase

Building a Flutter App with Complex UI

Review: Continuous Delivery for Mobile with fastlane

 We’ve been idly following fastlane since it was just deliver, and it has had a lively lifespan indeed from obscurity to Twitter to Google and all; so it’s reasonably sure it’s approaching industry standard status at this point, which would make a canonical introduction to it handy indeed. And, why, look what we have to review today, a shiny new copy of

Continuous Delivery for Mobile with fastlane

Fastlane Book Cover

 

Competitive mobile apps depend strongly on the development team’s ability to deliver successful releases, consistently and often. Although continuous integration took a more mainstream priority among the development industry, companies are starting to realize the importance of continuity beyond integration and testing…

What You Will Learn

  • Harness the fastlane tools for the Continuous Deployment strategy
  • Integrate Continuous Deployment with existing Continuous Integration.
  • Automate upload of screenshots across all device screen-sizes
  • Manage push notifications, provisioning profiles, and code-signing certificates
  • Orchestrate automated build and deployments of new versions of your app
  • Regulate your TestFlight users and on-board new testers

It’s actually not 100% accurate, that title; a more accurate one would be “The Complete Beginner’s Guide To How To Ship An iOS App With fastlane Making It Suck Less.” That wasn’t quite as buzzword-compliant, we suppose.

If you do happen to be an iOS-focused complete beginner at dealing with iTunes Connect and all, and you intend to follow the common path of Crashlytics and/or TestFlight for beta distribution … then yes, we believe we can recommend this unqualifiedly as the most coherent introduction out there, go buy it and you can stop reading now!

If you’ve already got this distribution thing sussed, and you’re just curious about whether this fastlane thing that all the cool kids are into these days is worth adopting … hmmm, we’ll give it a three out of five. It’s worthy at explaining what it does explain, but to make it five-star for the more accomplished developer, we’d need two star-worthy things:

1. Documentation on the Android setup and shipping process as thorough as there is for iOS. There’s about six pages worth here, which is pretty thin compared to the iOS coverage. 

If you couldn’t care less about shipping for Android, of course, then this is not a valid criticism.

2. More thorough examples of how to integrate with CI and testing services other than the selected ones, to actually deserve the Continuous Delivery label. As a specific omission we were looking for, the book promises

The next step in this beta lane is to distribute our app via two popular testing platforms: TestFlight and HockeyApp.

… and then goes on to not deliver on this promise for HockeyApp. Since that was, in fact, the main thing we were looking for in this book, how to set it up with a HockeyApp-centric workflow, we were disappointed. So we figure that we’ll take another point off for not being an encyclopedic reference. Yes, we’re brutal. Again, if you are a complete beginner and/or you do use the standard tools that the book does cover, this is not a valid criticism either.

Should you be teetering, here is the publisher’s page and you can check out the TOC and all; plus the code repo for the examples — adding fastlane to Firefox — is here on Github.

But definitely, if you know anyone who’s just getting into iOS development, we’d rate this the best introduction there is out there without question!

On the other hand, as long as we’re talking about fastlane and all, there is the odd pocket of resistance to it you might read for balance:

Five Options for iOS Continuous Delivery Without Fastlane

If you’re looking to escape Fastlane’s frequent build-breaking changes, these five options for iOS continuous delivery are worth examining…

… but that’s definitely a minority opinion, most people find it adds at least some value.

As an example, up there where I docked it a point for not including less popular CI/deployment options? Here is an example of one such:

How to set up GitLab Continuous Integration for iOS projects without a hassle

Why GitLab-CI?

We had GitLab and we couldn’t find any reason for using something else. So, we decided to use it, why not 😎? As for me, the GitLab-CI/CD is more developer-oriented than Jenkins. At least because it is aimed at the pipelines, tags, and branches, unlike Jenkins with jobs. And we have to use those things to get the necessary job instead of configuration without code. GitLab-CI/CD seems like a tool for running scripts on a remote machine; no more, but enough.

Some time later, we realized what it doesn’t matter what to use if we use Fastlane. Because it was able to do all what we needed. As the result, we got freedom from other tools. So I can strongly recommend using Fastlane instead of manual scripts or other approaches…

And, of course, we do find several mentions of “Hockey” over at 

fastlane/examples: “A collection of example fastlane setups”

so it’s not as if their omission is a crippling lack in any way. We just figure a book like this should aim for canonical completeness!

UPDATES:

Build it, Test it, Deliver it! Complete iOS Guide on Continuous Delivery with fastlane and Jenkins

Effortless iOS Code Signing With Match