Under The Bridge Under The Bridge

Category: iPhone
Join The Dark Side We Have WebCookies

Here is an excellent reference to keep handy for your next project … or when you’re finally getting that proper iOS 13-savvy redesign finished up for your current projects, not that any of us would be in that situation of course:

What a Designer Needs to Know about iOS Dark Mode When Working with a Developer

As a senior iOS app developer, it is my responsibility to analyse an app UI / UX design from a developer standpoint and provide feedback to the designers. One of the common problems that my team encounter is the communication gap between designers and developers, because of that, designers sometimes might create UI / UX design that is impossible or extremely difficult to implement by the technical team…

Feeling the pain? We know we’re feeling the pain.

With the introduction of dark mode in iOS 13, Apple has redefined the meaning of colors and UI styling in iOS, which further widen the communication gap between designers and developers. This has motivated me to create this article that from a technical perspective, explain what a designer need to know regarding adopting iOS dark mode in order to smoothen the communication between both parties…

And it is an excellent job of doing so!

More good reads for your designers are

How to design delightful dark themes

It is difficult to create a delightful dark theme. We cannot simply reuse our colors or invert our shades. If we do, we will achieve the opposite of what we want: we will increase eyestrain and make it harder to read in low light. We may even break our information hierarchy.

In this post, we share how to design dark themes that are readable, balanced, and delightful….

8 Tips for Dark Theme Design

When it comes to designing a dark theme for an existing app, you probably want to communicate the same spectrum of emotions in dark mode. But it’s better not to do it. Why? Because colors are actually perceived differently depending on their background…

Dark UI Design: A step-by-step guide

What’s New in iOS Design and Implementing Dark Mode on iOS

From the implementation side of things, here’s some articles worth reading for various tips and tricks:

Implementing iOS 13 Dark Mode in the new BigCommerce mobile app

Implementing Dark Mode on iOS

Implementing Dark Mode in iOS 13 (Instagram)

How To Adopt Dark Mode In Your iOS App

iOS 13 Dark Mode and companion DarkMode helpers

Dark Mode: Adding support to your app in Swift

Dark Mode on iOS 13

iOS 13 Semantic UI: “Dark Mode, Dynamic Type, and SF Symbols”

DynamicColor is “Yet another extension to manipulate colors easily in Swift and SwiftUI”

Backward compatible Dark Mode on iOS

Implement In-App Dark Mode Using Swift Observation Protocols

UPDATES:

Overriding Dark Mode

3D Touch Is Dead – Long Live Haptic Touch

So no doubt you noticed all the angst this summer about Apple possibly removing 3D Touch from iPhones, as indeed it did with the iPhone XR, if not catch up with the discussion here:

Possible Removal of 3D Touch With 2018 iPhones

… and once it actually happened, the seven usual stages of grief pretty much got dropped by most people and they headed straight to acceptance:

The iPhone XR shows how unnecessary 3D Touch has always been

Why does Apple’s 3D Touch fail miserably?

Personally, we figure the only problem with 3D Touch was discoverability, and a pretty much perfect fix was laid out here:

How Apple can fix 3D Touch

… Now that we know what the problem is, here is my solution. Like we did with the link texts years ago on the web, we should visually distinguish 3D Touchable buttons. Look at this same screen and see if you can tell which toggles accept 3D Touch … My solution is adding a line on bottom-right of things that can be 3D Touched. Let’s call them Force Decorators (with reference to Force Touch). 3D Touch is missing the most obvious thing to be mainstream. Visual cues. I think this is the answer.

Simple, elegant, and almost certainly correct; if you do support 3D Touch, consider adopting that!

However, given the lack of wrath from the buying public over the XR missing it, and the continuing Haptic Touch additions, seems like a pretty safe bet that we can consider 3D Touch a dead technology going forward … or at the very least should have parallel implementations. Which brings us to a pair of recent articles to recommend:

How to apply iOS 3D Touch to any UIView as a UIGestureRecognizer

….recently I needed to have an UIGestureRecognizer to apply to any UIView that intercepts 3D Touch as you can do with tap, drag, etc, but nothing similar is available in system libraries.
As result of my study about this implementation, I’ve written a UIGestureRecognizer subclass that can fit my needs…

Improve iOS apps user experience using Haptic Feedbacks and Taptic Engine using UIFeedbackGenerator

In my last post I wrote about introducing 3D Touch as common UIGestureRecognizer in any UIView to improve the interaction with your app, now I want to explore the haptic feedback which is giving us a new physical way to give control to the user of what is happening on his iPhone.
Until haptic feedback through taptic engine, play sounds were the only way to provide users a feedback about an action in the app, but sounds are annoying and sometimes creepy.

UIKit is providing us a clean and elegant way for that: a standard and safe interface for haptic feedbacks plug and play implementation, UIFeedbackGenerator…

If you haven’t checked out UIFeedbackGenerator before, here’s a good quick intro:

Creating an Immersive User Experience with Haptic Feedback in iOS

So, before designing your power user gesture interfaces going forward, check out those technology comparisons … and especially the 3D touch design/usability postmortems. Nothing worse than wasting time writing features that nobody actually uses!

UPDATES:

Remember back when we first collected articles on 3D touch, and digital scale apps were a nifty thing? Guess that’s going to go by the wayside as 3D Touch falls off as well. If you do have one of those apps, maybe you want to migrate to Android — check out the state of their art in 5 Best Real Digital Scale Apps for Android!

Haptico – “easy to use haptic feedback generator with pattern-play support” 

Improve iOS apps user experience using Haptic Feedbacks and Taptic Engine using UIFeedbackGenerator

UPDATES:

Haptic feedback in iOS apps

Captain AHAP: Custom Haptics Designer

Adding haptic feedback to your app with CoreHaptics

Haptrix — Core Haptics Designer

Creating Haptic Feedback in iOS 13 With Core Haptics