Archive for 'iPad'

Core Data And Swift

Been quite a while since the last time we rounded up Core Data goodies, since when we’ve gone through The iCloud Angst Apocalypse and ended up with that class of problem being relegated to the new CloudKit hotness … if you don’t need, like, cross-platform access or anything. Which most people want. As, indeed, we’re going to be designing the iOS side of a project in that cross-platform space next week; so let’s take a look at what’s going on now in the new Swifty iOS 8 world, shall we?

First off, here’s an decently comprehensive curation of important tools as the Swift world dawns — keep an eye on all of these to see how they adapt to new world Swiftiness:

Top 10 Core Data Tools and Libraries :

Marcus Zarra gives us The Core Data Stack In Swift which inspired Core Data Stack in Swift Simplified

kylef/QueryKit is a nifty Core Data query language in Swift; also check out kylef/KFData for some convenient Objective-C conveniences

Another interesting initiative (h/t ManiacDev) is Alecrim/AlecrimCoreData: “a Core Data wrapper library written in Swift, “inspired” by MagicalRecord and LINQ.”

Read Swift Core Data Format String Injection — or end up as an xkcd cartoon

Like videos? There’s a bunch here. This series looks particularly worthwhile, comes with code and is updated through the current Xcode 6b5:

UPDATES:

Core Data Batch Updates in iOS 8 And Swift

SugarRecord / SugarRecord: “…you’ll be able to start the CoreData stack structure just with a line of code and start working with your database models using closures thanks to the fact that SugarRecord is completly written in Swift.”

mogenerator 1.28 has “experimental” Swift code generation

New in Core Data and iOS 8: Batch Updating with Core Data Demo: Batch Updating and Asynchronous Fetching

Swift: Distributing Core Data Entities Over a Network

iOS 8: Core Data and Asynchronous Fetching

Your First Core Data App Using Swift

michaelarmstrong / SuperRecord: “A small set of utilities to make working with CoreData and Swift a bit easier.”

Protocols in Swift with Core Data

tadija / AERecord: ”Why do we need yet another one Core Data wrapper? You tell me!”

Core Data versioning is not temporal … My general recommendation is to avoid heavy migrations at all costs. They are not designed to work on iOS and frequently cause issues.”

Core Data Relationships Data Loss Bug when calling migratePersistentStore

WatchKit [and all others] Extension Problem: Sharing a Core Data Store Can Lead to Duplicate Entries

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Review: Learning iPhone Game Development with Cocos2D 3.0

Quite the twisted trail it’s been since we first noticed cocos2d-iphone way back in 2008 and watched it grow, split, recombine, be acquhired, and eventually have the founder jump ship for the C++ version cocos2d-x. It was looking bleak there for us peoples tasteful enough to revile the thought of sullying ourselves with other, lesser, platforms for a while there until Apportable stepped up to support what’s been a surprisingly frantic divergence from the cross-platform strains, not least the currently misnomed rechristening as “Cocos2D-Swift”.

And today, we’re going to take a look at the first and only so far book out there on learning modern Cocos2D-Swift,

Learning iPhone Game Development with Cocos2D 3.0

0144OS_Cocos2D 3.0.jpg.png

The book follows the style of introducing concepts over the course of developing a single game called ‘CocoHunt’ which can be downloaded from the App Store and has its source available on Github. It assumes basic familiarity with Xcode and Objective-C, focusing solely on Cocos2D coding. And, unfortunately, that means no discussion of SpriteBuilder, which our first reaction is a significant flaw in an introductory book to modern Cocos2D. But let’s take a walkthrough of the book, as described by itself in the Preface:

Chapter 1, All About Cocos2D, provides basic information about game engines, additional information about Cocos2D, as well as examples of great games created with Cocos2D.

In which our above concern is addressed:

However, using SpriteBuilder doesn’t eliminate the need to write the code and understand how Cocos2D works. This is why, I strongly believe that first you need to learn pure Cocos2D and after that it will be very easy to start using SpriteBuilder and make your life even easier.

Well, that’s a valid perspective. Ours is to put off learning anything that there’s easier ways to accomplish, since after 20+ years in this industry we figure that knowledge becomes obsolete so fast that investing more than the minimum you can get away with is generally a misallocation of resources.

Chapter 2, Hello Cocos2D, guides you through the installation process and reviews the contents of the Cocos2D distribution package and demo projects that come with it.

And runs you through a hello world project with a sprite and label. Straightforwardly done.

Chapter 3, Cocos2D – Under the Hood, describes the architecture of the framework and its main classes. In the second part of this chapter, we will review several Cocos2D configuration options.

This would have been a good chapter to use as an introduction to SpriteBuilder, relating the architecture to SpriteBuilder’s layout. As it is, it’s a bit awkwardly placed to break rhythm. As the author acknowledges:

I know that you want to start writing the code and creating games as soon as possible. If you just can’t fight this feeling, then skip to Chapter 4…

That we’d say is a solid clue that our suggestion is a good one. (OK, we swear we’ll stop harping on SpriteBuilder now. Really.)

Chapter 4, Rendering Sprites, begins to unveil the process of game creation. In this chapter, we will add a game scene, background image, player, and enemy characters. We will review some of the main properties of Cocos2D nodes and will make them move, rotate, flip, and so on.

Remarkably well done chapter! As well as all the display basics you’ll need, smoothly works in anchor points, character composition, and use of TexturePacker even.

Chapter 5, Starting the Action, covers the process of controlling the game using states, handling touches, or using a gyroscope to get player input. At the end of this chapter, we will have a skeleton of a playable game.

Another excellent chapter, thoroughly covers interactivity as described and works in some good coordinate spaces and vector math discussion too.

Chapter 6, Rendering Text, shows you how to display score, lives, earned points, and winning and losing labels. In this chapter, we will use both True Type and Bitmap font-based labels of Cocos2D and will discuss benefits and performance considerations.

Straightforward and competent; covers Glyph Designer too.

Chapter 7, Animations and Particle Systems, demonstrates the use of different animation types and shows how to use particle systems to get really cool effects such as explosion and fire.

Competent enough for a beginner book, although we would’ve liked a little more on skeletal animation; covers Particle Designer too.

Chapter 8, Adding Sound Effects and Music, shows how to easily add sound effects and music, switch between music tracks, and adjust audio properties.

Again straightforward and competent, nice that it mentioned sourcing and attributing from Freesound, Nature Sounds For Me, and NoSoapRadio. Cool stuff, check them out!

Chapter 9, User Interface and Navigation, concentrates on creating a convenient user interface using Cocos2D controls such as buttons, the scroll view, table view, and so on. In this chapter, we will see how to create scenes that exist in most games, such as the menu scene, about scene, and so on, and how to navigate between them.

That sound like a lot to cover? Yes it is, and the “and so on” covers a good many asides. There’s a bit too much crammed in here we think, probably would have been a bit easier to follow if focused into UI and navigation chapters; but it’s certainly very good as is.

Chapter 10, Physics, shows how to use the physics engine in your game. In this chapter, we will create a playable level using the physics engine; we will review how to create physics objects, adjust their properties, detect and filter collisions, use joints, and so on.

Yet another exceptionally well done chapter. Can’t think of an introduction to using physics engines we’ve ever read that was better than this, actually; balances features and explanation just about perfectly to get you started.

Chapter 11, Working with Tile Maps, explains tile maps and shows the complete process of creating and using a tile map in the game.

Including parallax animation as well, which is a nice feature to have explained in a learning book.

Chapter 12, Standing Out – Integrating Game Center and In-App Purchases, covers integrating Game Center and adding In-App purchases to the game.

For some reason, you have to download this chapter separately and the Preface link doesn’t work. But once you get past that gratuitous annoyance, again a straightforward and competent explanation of the described tasks. And bonus points for a nice collection of various asset-finding links for the penniless indie to finish off the book with!

So overall, we’re pretty darn impressed here, quality ranges from nicely done to downright outstanding all the way through the book; the best introductory Cocos2D book written yet, we’d say. Our only serious problem with it is that there isn’t any introduction to SpriteBuilder. And there’s a book devoted to that in progress by Steffen Itterheim, so if you’re more of a visual tool type person you might want to wait for that one. But if you want to get started NOW!, or you’re not a visual type person, then hey this is your best and most current choice for learning Cocos2D-Swift!

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iOS 8 Grab Bag

So, pretty much got your head around Swift now and ready to move on to all the other new goodies in iOS 8? Here’s a series that’s been chugging along since WWDC well worth your time to read:

Over in the Wenderlich tutorial empire, we see no reason to expect that this will be less awesome than the last three of which we bought all, so we’ll confidently recommend that you go ahead and preorder

iOS 8 by Tutorials: Learning the new iOS 8 APIs with Swift or hey, go whole hog with Swift by Tutorials Bundle

In the meantime, there’s lots of Swift tutorials, and this introduction to Metal

iOS 8 Metal Tutorial with Swift: Getting Started

If you deal with passwords anywhere in your app, if you’ve missed it so far (h/t: ManiacDev) head over now to

AgileBits/onepassword-app-extension

Welcome! With just a few lines of code, your app can add 1Password support, enabling your users to:

  • Access their 1Password Logins to automatically fill your login page.
  • Use the Strong Password Generator to create unique passwords during registration, and save the new Login within 1Password.
  • Quickly fill 1Password Logins directly into web views.

And even if you don’t have password management, take the time to read their very nice explanation of extension security at

Filling with your approval: On 1Password’s App Extension and iOS 8 security

Here’s a nice little button class (h/t iOS Dev Weekly) to get you started with the funky effect stuff:

AYVibrantButton is a stylish button with iOS 8 vibrancy effect. It is a subclass of UIButton that has a simple yet elegant appearance and built-in support for UIVisualEffectView and UIVibrancyEffect classes introduced in iOS 8. Yet, it can be used on iOS 7 without the vibrancy effect…

Here’s an iOS 8 savvy HUD class whose necessity is explained for those who might question it as

There already are so many other open source progress HUD components!

While other progress HUD components are nice they all have their problems. MBProgressHUD is outdated and buggy, MMProgressHUD is totally over engineered and requires a long time to implement, SVProgressHUD and HTProgressHUD are not implemented in the right way and they all don’t offer the extensibility of JGProgressHUD. JGProgressHUD was inspired by all of these components to create the ideal progress indicator.

We adore people not overburdened with modesty.

UPDATES:

Self Sizing Table View Cells; Understanding Self Sizing Cells and Dynamic Type in iOS 8

A Step-By-Step Tutorial On Using iOS 8′s New Keyboard Extension; The Trials and Tribulations of Writing a 3rd Party iOS Keyboard

UIAlertController Changes in iOS 8

iOS 8 Privacy Updates

iOS8 Sampler for iOS

Working with Touch ID API in iOS 8 SDK

iOS 8 Metal Tutorial with Swift: Getting Started; Metal By Example; objc.io’s Metal

Image Resizing Techniques and PHImage​Manager

Introducing the iOS 8 Feast!

Apps Using iOS 8 Extensions

What we learned building the Tumblr iOS share extension

EL Mustache – iOS 8 Photo Extension in Swift

iOS 8 Handoff Tutorial; Working with Handoff in iOS 8

Tutorial: Creating Interactive Notifications With iOS 8’s Notification Actions

Introduction to iOS 8 App Extension: Creating a Today Widget

Share Extension Iterations

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Project Diagnostics: Faux Pas

Hey, we can all use some more help finding problems in our projects, right? Check out this most promising new tool Faux Pas:

What the Clang Static Analyzer is to your code, Faux Pas is to your whole Xcode project.

Faux Pas inspects all of these things together:

  • Code
  • Project configuration (e.g. build settings)
  • Interface Builder files
  • Static assets (e.g. images)
  • Version control

This means it can warn you about errors that span the boundaries between these different parts of the project. For example:

  • Code tries to load a resource file that doesn’t exist
  • Code uses a localization key that is missing for some languages
  • Project references a file that is outside of the version control root
  • Project is missing an API usage description (e.g. NSContactsUsageDescription) while using that API in the code

So we figured we’d give it a shot at our current project. In which our code compiles clean with -Weverything, because we play Xcode on hard level, so it ought to be good right? Well, not by 5825 problems, doh!

Screen Shot 2014-08-03 at 7.03.41 AM.png

There is a lot of stuff this thing checks that’s impossible to check efficiently any other way. We’d go into more detail … but why bother? It’s an demonstratedly invaluable tool, download it now!

h/t: iOS Dev Weekly!

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Unsustainable Apps: Revolver

The good news is, there’s a pretty cool open sourced app for you to check out (h/t iOS Dev Weekly):

Ciechan/Revolved: a 3D modelling app for the iPad

  • OpenGL ES 2.0 based rendering integrated with UIKit
  • custom animation engine
  • a bit of private API hackery

The line drawing system has been explained in detail on my blog

The bad news?

Screen Shot 2014-07-27 at 12.18.55 PM.png

Ouch! Damn, that’s just painful. Although sadly usual, these days:

The Majority Of Today’s App Businesses Are Not Sustainable

Accounting for 47% of app developers, the “have nothings” include the 24% of app developers – who are interested in making money, it should be noted – who make nothing at all.

Meanwhile, 23% make something, but it’s under $100 per month … those who prioritize iOS app development are less likely to find themselves in this group, with 35% earning $0-$100 per month, versus the 49% of Android developers…

Meanwhile, 22% are “poverty stricken” developers whose apps make $100 to $1,000 per app per month…

A Candid Look at Unread’s First Year

Unread for iPhone has earned a total of $32K in App Store sales. Unread for iPad has earned $10K. After subtracting 40 percent in self-employment taxes and $350/month for health care premiums (times 12 months), the actual take-home pay from the combined sales of both apps is:

$21,000, or $1,750/month

Considering the enormous amount of effort I have put into these apps over the past year, that’s a depressing figure. I try not to think about the salary I could earn if I worked for another company, with my skills and qualifications. It’s also a solid piece of evidence that shows that paid-up-front app sales are not a sustainable way to make money on the App Store…

I suppose this is a sign of maturity, the app market is starting to resemble other creative markets like books, art, and music as the returns to individual creators shake out. Depressing, isn’t it? But chin up and move on, just means we have to get better at marketing. And here is an excellent article on how to go about that:

How Hours became a top grossing app

… when I asked on Twitter what people want to know about, the overwhelming response was: how on earth did you market the app? Some seem to believe I have this magical ability to get featured by Apple, TechCrunch, etc. etc. etc. I don’t. It takes time and a lot of hard work and I started out just like anybody else so this stuff is completely do-able. I don’t have all the answers but I’ll tell you what I did…

TL; DR: Make a lot of friends. And it’s hard work. But read the whole thing!

UPDATES:

Increasing In-App Revenue with Metric Driven Design and Emotional Targeting

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Airline Booking: Aviasales SDK

You know, iOS Dev Weekly gets the best ads. We’d overlooked this one until now:

Flight search engine in your app

Help your users find the cheapest flight tickets right in your app and earn $7 per booking. Use a ready template or build your flight search from scratch with Aviasales iOS SDK framework.

Well, that sounds interesting, doesn’t it? Pretty simple:

1) Sign up as a travelpayouts.com affiliate. And it really is just sign up, no approval process.

2) Grab KosyanMedia/Aviasales-iOS-SDK off GitHub

3) Take a look at all the other affiliate tools they’ve got on offer

4) ???

5) PROFIT!

h/t: iOS Dev Weekly!

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Print On Demand: Kite SDK

Feel like adding print on demand to your app? Check this out:

OceanLabs / iOS-Print-SDK

The Kite Print SDK makes it easy to add print on demand functionality to your app.

Harness our worldwide print and distribution network. We’ll take care of all the tricky printing and postage stuff for you!

To get started, you will need to have a free Kite developer account. Go to kite.ly to sign up for free.

Products

Use print to unlock hidden revenue streams and add value for your users. In under an hour you could be using our SDK to print:

  • Magnets
  • Polaroid Style Prints
  • Square Prints
  • Postcards
  • A4 (invoices, letters, etc)
  • New products being added monthly

We mentioned another print on demand service the Sincerely Ship Library a long time ago, and they still seem to be around as well, but if you want more than postcards this one looks well worth looking into!

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Video Killed The Screenshot Star

So it’s not enough that designing the increasingly misnamed “screenshots” for your App Store listing is a full-fledged production process these days, now you need to ramp up your video production skills as well:

App Previews

App Previews are short videos showcasing what’s great about your app to help users decide if it’s right for them. Customers can watch App Previews directly from your app details page in the App Store. App Previews are composed primarily of device-captured footage of your app to help customers make more informed download decisions.

How Do I Create an App Preview?

With iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite, you can capture real-time footage of your app directly off your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. Just connect your device to your Mac using the Lightning connector and it will be automatically available as a video camera. You can capture anything you’re doing on-screen directly to your Mac using QuickTime Player. Edit your captured footage in your favorite video editing app and upload it on iTunes Connect—just like your screenshots—to submit it for review along with your next app update…

Availability

App Previews appear on your app details page in the App Store on iOS 8 or later. App developers can submit their App Previews this Fall.

So, time to get on that then, right after watching the “Creating Great App Previews” WWDC session. If there is such a thing as “your favourite video editing app,” that is. Those of us who would be hard pressed to even name any video editing app, never mind have a favourite one, well we do have a bit more of a challenge here, don’t we now.

No doubt in short order there will be a great deal of options to help us with that; but at the moment the only established option we’re aware of enough to have linked to before is Apptamin, who have here an excellent post here to get you up to speed,

App Previews (video on the iOS 8 App Store): Thoughts and Tips

Video on the App Store. It’s (almost) here. It’s awesome for App Developers. One can’t help but wonder why it’s only coming now when the Google Play Store and the Amazon App Store have added it a long time ago. But it doesn’t really matter. After producing close to 300 promo videos and game trailers since we started Apptamin, we do have some thoughts about the App Previews that were introduced. And a few tips as well…

Read the whole thing, as they say. And then these:

How to Produce an App Promo Video

10 Examples of Great App Promo Videos

The Ultimate Guide To Using Video For App Marketing

Let’s Make a Promo

Getting Started with App Previews

Everything You Need To Know About iOS 8 App Previews

UPDATES:

Ideon / SmudgeKit: “provides a drop in replacement for UIWindow to draw visual representations of all touch events to the screen. Ideal for for creating App Previews or other screencasts where it is crucial to show touch gestures.”

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CloudKit On The Horizon

So we’ve previously observed with some amusement the insurmountable opportunities associated with Core Data iCloud synchronization, and noted some valiant efforts to redress the situation that unfortunately seem to have not set the world on fire; and, well, it seems that Apple’s pretty much given up on that. You may have noticed that the “What’s New in Core Data” WWDC 2014 was a little … thin, yes? Like the iCloud news segment was one slide,

  • Transitioning to new infrastructure
  • Reliability improvements
  • Performance enhancements
  • Transparent to developers

Hmmm. When the year’s news can be comprehensively enumerated as “sucks less”, that’s not the best investment signal, is it now.

But wait! We have a new hotness in the data sync world, or at least the Apple fiefdoms therein, as posted at iCloud For Developers:

CloudKit

Leverage the full power of iCloud and build apps with the new CloudKit framework. Now you can easily and securely store and efficiently retrieve your app data like structured data in a database or assets right from iCloud. CloudKit also enables your users to anonymously sign in to your apps with their iCloud Apple IDs without sharing their personal information.

With CloudKit, you can focus on your client-side app development and let iCloud eliminate the need to write server-side application logic. CloudKit provides you with Authentication, private and public database, structured and asset storage services — all for free with very high limits.

Introducing CloudKit

Advanced CloudKit

What’s New in Core Data

iCloud Design Guide (Pre-release)

CloudKit Framework Reference (Pre-release)

And although they list ‘What’s New in Core Data’ there, we’d like to bestow our 2014 WWDC Unintentional Deadpan Humour Award to Melissa Turner for her commentary on that session’s single CloudKit slide:

… I don’t know what either of those means. You should probably go watch the video of their session. Somebody gave me these slides. And asked me please to talk to you guys about it.

Why, she reminds us of our own style of following orders under protest! And just in case you missed that subtle hint, the only related session mentioned at the end was “Introducing CloudKit”. So, y’know, it’s not like the signposts here are anything other than completely obvious.

The general industry reaction is represented nicely here,

What does Apple’s CloudKit mean for mBaaS

Architecting an application around CloudKit locks your data into the Apple ecosystem. This means no access to this data for your Android application that half your users use. No access for your web application, no access for your web app, and no access to the data for your analytics engine to crunch the numbers.

Apple has yet to release any details of a REST API or export mechanism for this data. While the appeal when writing a simple application might be to use the out-of-the-box cloud APIs made available by Apple, in the longer term will prove very limiting. When extending this application to other platforms mobile or otherwise, there’s no way to utilise the same database elsewhere.

Apple of course has an agenda here – they’re trying to encourage developers, and thus in turn users, into their closed ecosystem – and a fantastic ecosystem it is. Unfortunately, that’s not the reality of the market. Users access applications across disparate platforms, made by disparate vendors. That should make CloudKit a non-runner for most applications.

Sounds about right. But for those with more modest initial goals, it’s pretty cool yes? Some commentaries worth reading:

Notes on CloudKit

But I still bet that lots of apps will benefit from this. Somewhere people are thinking about their existing apps and how they’d benefit — and people are planning new apps that they wouldn’t have otherwise been willing to try.

I think this is going to be a huge deal. I think it’s the first time Apple has really nailed a web service for developers. And I tip my hat to the team (or teams) behind all this. Good job, folks.

Did CloudKit Sherlock Ensembles?

First, let me say, I think CloudKit is awesome. It probably should have been iCloud 1.0 three years ago. Apple have done a great job, and I fully expect this to succeed. It’s particularly useful for apps that not only need cloud storage, but also have social aspects.

CloudKit is basically Apple’s take on schema-less cloud storage. Think Parse.com or Azure Mobile Services, and you’ve pretty well grasp CloudKit. You can store data records in the cloud — not just files — and don’t have to write any networking code. You can insert records, form relationships, and perform search queries, much like a cloud variant of Core Data (though not as powerful).

As good as it seems to be, there are limitations. CloudKit is not cross platform, so you can forget Android, and there is no web access to the data. But there should be plenty of smaller companies happy just to ‘win’ the Apple market, so I think it will get adopted.

Certainly makes sense to us to ship an economical iOS-only minimum viable product and rearchitect for cross-platform once it’s clear the investment is merited, so even in the current state CloudKit looks like a pretty big win. And we think it’s a fairly good bet that API and/or export mechanisms are on the roadmap too; it’s rather stretching credulity to think Apple believes they can wall their garden quite that high and still expect developers to enthusiastically embrace the technology. Check back after WWDC 2015, and we’ll see how well placed that confidence turned out to be!

UPDATES:

CloudKit: The raywenderlich.com Podcast Episode 9

Choosing CloudKit brings up the point of data security, at least the user perception of such, that might be not insignificant depending on your intended app:

They will not need to setup another account with yet another set of credentials to manage. More importantly, their data will be stored with Apple, a vendor they have already choosen to trust. It will be stored in siloed, private data stores that not even the developer can access. That cannot be said for apps using Azure, Parse or other backend services.

Web Services, Dependencies, and CloudKit

CloudKit: The fastest route to implementing the auto-synchronizing app you’ve been working on? with Get up and Running with iOS 8′s CloudKit

Beginning CloudKit Tutorial

About iCloud changes in 1Password 5

“…apparently it’s also the API that Apple has always wanted for itself.”

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Dringend: Xcode On Your iPad

OK, this one wins top honours in the “Just Because We Can” category: How would you like to develop your Xcode project … on your iPad?

Dringend – The development environment for your iPad

Dringend is a fast and easy to use iOS and Mac app development environment for your iPad. Program and build your apps on the go from your iPad (Mac also required) using a beautiful and intuitive code editor and all your changes will be synced back to your Mac when your done. Wherever you may be in the world, whether on a beach or sitting at a cafe you can continue to develop your apps and even build and run them…

  • Build and run your iOS projects on your iPad (Mac app, Dropbox account & registration as official iOS developer required to run project)
  • Full syntax highlighting (including Logos support)
  • Find and replace
  • Auto-indentation
  • Code structure list to view methods and pragma marks in files
  • Additional keys to make accessing commonly used programming keys easier
  • Project syncing with Dropbox
  • Full keyboard dock and bluetooth keyboard support
  • Import Xcode projects from Dropbox
  • Export Xcode projects from iPad to Dropbox
  • Import files from Dropbox
  • Creating new Xcode projects from templates (same as in Xcode)
  • Create new files from Xcode templates
  • Delete, move and generally edit the Xcode project structure

Check out video and details on the website here; setup instructions are pretty easy,

Dringend allows you to build and run apps by connecting to your development Mac at home and using your Mac to build the app and send the output back to Dringend.

To enable this simply download The Constructor.app which acts as the build server for Dringend. All you need to select is the code signing identity you wish to use (this can be found in Keychain Access.app) and the provisioning profile. From there the app will handle everything.

The build server also automatically sets up port forwarding on your router so that no matter where you are in the world you will be able to build and run your apps from Dringend…

Not completely sure that this is the most practical idea compared to just carrying a laptop, but hey, if you want to travel really light and still get work done, check it out!

h/t: ManiacDev!

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